Lovesick Studio

Home

Author Profile: Kazuo Ishiguro

artworks-000006353644-d1zrte-original.jpg

Kazuo Ishiguro is one of my favourite authors; he's very renowned already but I thought that I'd share some of his less known works. I haven't read all of his books - I think I have two more. What I love the most about Ishiguro is that he explores a diverse range of genres, historical settings, and character and yet the tone of his works remain the same. I guess its his way of expressing the transcendence of human struggle Here are my two cents of his works that I've read so far:

A Pale View of Hills

(1982) - A very short book but enjoyable nonetheless. It's about a woman living in the UK reflecting on her life back in Japan. Since it is his earliest work, I do feel that it's a bit different from the later, more popular ones. It 's still good, and has the same overarching themes of the later works (loneliness, lost identity, alienation from society, etc.) I found it to be kind of like a thriller. Not to give anything away, but the ending is quite a surprise.

The Remains of the Day

(1989) - My favourite! If you love dialogue from classic, modern writers of the early 20th century (like D.H. Lawrence) then you'll just love this book. Like many of his works, it's not plot-diven but the dialogue is just impeccable. The 1993 movie adaptation, which is also amazing, was very well-received so many people are familiar with the plot. It's basically about the life of a butler working in an estate following WWII as he comes to terms with modernity and his purpose in life. 

The Unconsoled

(1995) - This one is difficult to explain because it is quite abstractive. I don't know if I could recommend this one if you're just starting out with this books because from the reviews I read, people either loved it or hated it. I liked it because I'm a fan of the author but it was a bit difficult to get through at times. It's like a coming-of-age type story about a musician, although he doesn't know who he is and learns about his own identity as the plot progresses. 

When We Were Orphans

(2000) - I would say this is the most plot-driven book of all of these. The story is very engaging - it's about a detective who's trying to figure out the mystery surrounding the disappearance of his parents. It takes place in the UK and Shanghai so it's a bit different. In a way though, because it is a thriller and more action-filled, it loses a bit of its depth in comparison to the other works.

Never Let Me Go

(2005) - Everyone probably knows about this one because of the movie adaptation starring Keira Knightly, Carey Mulligan and Andrew Garfield. I liked how he experimented with a new genre once again. It's a dystrophic novel but the themes that he usually uses are still evident. Very poignant and definitely a must-read before you watch the film if you haven't already. 

Which author can you not get enough of? What have you read recently? If you've read any of these books, I would love to hear what you think!